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Thursday, April 23, 2020 | History

7 edition of Frederick Douglass and the Fourth of July found in the catalog.

Frederick Douglass and the Fourth of July

speaking truth to America

by James A. Colaiaco

  • 163 Want to read
  • 3 Currently reading

Published by Palgrave Macmillan in New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States.
    • Subjects:
    • Douglass, Frederick, 1818-1895.,
    • Fourth of July.,
    • Constitutional history -- United States.,
    • African Americans -- Civil rights -- History -- 19th century.,
    • Antislavery movements -- United States.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references and index.

      StatementJames A. Colaiaco.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsE449.D75 C63 2006
      The Physical Object
      Paginationp. cm.
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3427367M
      ISBN 101403970335
      LC Control Number2005051520


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Frederick Douglass and the Fourth of July by James A. Colaiaco Download PDF EPUB FB2

Frederick Douglass understood this all too well in his excoriating Fourth of July speech "The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro" given in To Douglass, who opened his speech with due praise for the founders of the nation, the promise of the "fathers of the republic" made the then current enslavement of fellow humans all the more appalling, sad, and shameful:Cited by: Frederick Douglass understood this all too well in his excoriating Fourth of July speech "The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro" given in To Douglass, who opened his speech with due praise for the founders of the nation, the promise of the "fathers of the republic" made the then current enslavement of fellow humans all the more appalling, sad, and shameful/5(9).

Praise for Frederick Douglass and the Fourth of July “With incisive analysis and elegant prose, Colaiaco explains the rhetorical atmosphere in which Douglass crafted and delivered his speech.” — Publishers WeeklyCited by: Colaiaco's "Frederick Douglass and the Fourth of July Oration" has as its named subject a speech that Douglass ( -- ) gave in Rochester, New York on July 5, Frederick Douglass and the Fourth of July book, generally known as "What, to the American Slave, is your 4th of July?"/5.

Frederick Douglass on the Fourth of July By AAIHS Editors July 4, 1 *The following post is an abridged version of Fredrick Douglass ‘ famed speech, “What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?,” originally delivered at Corinthian Hall in Rochester, New York, on July 5, Frederick Douglass' 4th of July Speech: “What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?” July 5, It is admitted in the fact that Southern statute-books are covered with enactments, forbidding, Frederick Douglass and the Fourth of July book severe fines and penalties, the teaching of the slave to read and write.

Frederick Douglass and the Fourth of July book The Life of Frederick Douglass [Born as Frederick Augustus. by Frederick Douglass July 5, Mr. President, Friends and Fellow Citizens: He who could address this audience without a quailing sensation, has stronger nerves than I.

Frederick Douglass was a fiery orator and his speeches were often published in various abolitionist newspapers. Among his well-known speeches is "The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro," presented in Rochester, New York, on July 5,a version of which he published as a booklet.

It is often studied in literature classes today. The psalm describes how the captors asked the exiled Frederick Douglass and the Fourth of July book to sing. Frederick Douglass and the Fourth of July book Frederick Douglass recites this psalm in order to illustrate the similarity between his own situation—as an African American asked to give a Fourth of July speech to a white audience—and that of the Jewish captives asked to sing “in a strange land.”.

No one could write a powerful essay like Frederick Douglass. If you havent read this essay, you should. He makes a very compelling argument about the hypocrisy of the 4th of July since it celebrates the nations freedom while its black people are enslaved and disenfranchised/5.

For Douglass, the Fourth of July is a strong symbol of American hypocrisy—indeed, the whole speech is based on this idea—and he mentions it by name several times: This Fourth of July is yours, not mine.

(19) [T]he character and conduct of this nation never looked blacker to me than on this Fourth of July. (30). Frederick Douglass and the Fourth of July User Review - Not Available - Book Verdict Colaiaco (Sch. of Continuing & Professional Studies, NYU;Martin Luther King, Jr.).

They had come to hear the oration by Frederick Douglass celebrating the Fourth of July. By this time, he had become an esteemed abolitionist and the most famous black American of his era. Douglass had been invited to speak by the Rochester Ladies' Anti-Slavery : St.

Martin''s Publishing Group. What to the Slave is the Fourth of July Kindle Edition by Frederick Douglass (Author) › Visit Amazon's Frederick Douglass Page. Find all the books, read about the author, and more. See search results for this author. Are you an author. 5/5(8). Elements: Project Speaker: Frederick Douglass.

Credibility: Author,Government Official, Journalist, Civil Rights Activist. The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro by Frederick Douglass. A speech given at Rochester, New York, July 5, The papers and placards say that I am to deliver a Fourth of July Oration. This certainly sounds large, and out of the common way, for me.

It is true that I have often had the privilege to speak in this beautiful Hall, and to. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave My Bondage and My Freedom Life and Times of Frederick Douglass Writings & Speeches: The Heroic Slave My Escape from Slavery What to the Slave is the Fourth of July.

Self-Made Men The Church and Prejudice The Color Line The Future of the Colored Race Abolition Fanaticism in New York/5(6). On July 5th,Frederick Douglass, one of the greatest orators of all time, delivered what was arguably the century's most powerful abolition speech.

At a time of year where American freedom is celebrated across the nation, Douglass eloquently summoned the country to resolve the contradiction between slavery and the founding principles of our country. — Frederick Douglass, "What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?" I. Some five to six hundred people filed into Corinthian Hall in Rochester, New York on July 5, They had come to hear the oration by Frederick Douglass celebrating the Fourth of July.

The Paperback of the What, to the Slave, Is the Fourth of July by Frederick Douglass at Barnes & Noble. FREE Shipping on $35 or Brand: Charles River Editors. In the manner of Garry Wills's Lincoln at Gettysburg (), James A.

Colaiaco's study of Frederick Douglass's famous Independence Day speech is far more than an examination of a single three-hour speech. Colaiaco instead seeks to probe the political and social thinking of the most famous African American abolitionist, social reformer, and political Author: William B.

Rogers. On July 5th,Frederick Douglass, one of the greatest orators of all time, delivered what was arguably the century's most powerful abolition speech.

At a time of year where American freedom is celebrated across the nation, Douglass eloquently summoned the country to resolve the contradiction between slavery and the founding principles of our country. In July ofFrederick Douglass delivered a speech titled “What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?,” a call for the promise of liberty be applied equally to all Americans.

Douglass’s speech emphasized that American slavery and American freedom is a shared history and that the actions of ordinary men and women, demanding freedom, transformed our nation. On July 5,Frederick Douglass gave a speech at a meeting sponsored by the Rochester (N.Y.) Ladies' Anti-Slavery Society.

The speech, and indeed the. Colaiaco's Frederick Douglass and the Fourth of July will undoubtedly attract many readers. Its elegant prose and masterful interweaving of Douglass' powerful July 4th oration () with the events that brought him to the forefront in the fight against slavery make this book a must read for anyone interested in understanding the issues that led to the tragic Civil War/5.

The Online Books Page. Online Books by. Frederick Douglass (Douglass, Frederick, ) Online books about this author are available, as is a Wikipedia article. Douglass, Frederick,contrib.: Arguments, Pro and Con, on The Call for a National Emigration Convention, To Be Held in Cleveland, Ohio, August,by Frederick Douglass, W.J.

In this collection, students will review the life of Frederick Douglass and learn about one of his most famous speeches, "The Meaning of Fourth of July for the Negro" (it is also commonly referred to as "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July).

They will explore the strategies he uses to persuade and compare staged readings of the speech. Douglass argued that the Fourth of July in the year was a joke, as slavery’s practice was then at its peak, but that the holiday as it started and as it should have been could yet live up.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July. by Frederick Douglass (, Paperback) at the best online prices at eBay.

Free shipping for many products. An extract of the speech, “What to the Slave is the Fourth of July,” given by Frederick Douglass in his book, “My bondage and my freedom.” — submitted photo Facebook Twitter.

"What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?" is the title now given to a speech by Frederick Douglass delivered on July 5,in Corinthian Hall, Rochester, New York, addressing the Rochester Ladies' Anti-Slavery Society.

The speech is perhaps the most widely known of all of Frederick Douglass' writings save his autobiographies. Frederick Douglass was an OG badass who had no time for mincing words or keeping his opinions to himself.

There are Frederick Douglass quotes on just about everything any red-blooded American snowflake would care about, from women’s rights and peace to advocating for free public education and working to end capital : Tracy Shapley.

Frederick Douglass - July 4, This text is part of the Internet Modern History Sourcebook. The Sourcebook is a collection of public domain and copy-permitted texts for introductory level classes in modern European and World history. Frederick Douglass (born Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey; c.

February – Febru ) was an American social reformer, abolitionist, orator, writer, and escaping from slavery in Maryland, he became a national leader of the abolitionist movement in Massachusetts and New York, gaining note for his oratory and incisive antislavery : Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey.

In his third autobiography, American abolitionist, editor, orator, author, statesman, and reformer Frederick Douglass reflected upon his life, observing that he had lived several lives in one: first, the life of slavery; secondly, the life of a fugitive from slavery; thirdly, the life of comparative freedom; fourthly, the life of conflict and battle; and fifthly, the life of victory, if not.

On the Fourth of July,America celebrated its freedom, as it does every Independence Day. Frederick Douglass, America’s most famous anti-slavery activist and fugitive slave, saw no ground Author: Ibram X Kendi.

This Fourth of July we would like to pay homage to Frederick Douglass, a powerful voice for human rights and one of the foremost leaders of the abolitionist movement. In the video below various famous and emerging actors read sections of Frederick Douglass’ landmark speech “What to the Slave is the 4th of July?”.

Frederick Douglass and the fourth of July --Narrating America's revolutionary past --Denouncing America's present --Converting to the United States Constitution --The ominous future: a nation on the brink --The Dred Scott decision and the American dilemma --The United States Constitution is anti-slavery.

Responsibility: James A. Colaiaco. What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July a Rhetorical Analysis Words | 5 Pages. In his speech, What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?, Frederick Douglass passionately argues that to the slave, and even to the freed African American, the Fourth of July is no more than a mockery of the grossest kind.

The Frederick Douglass Statue in Emancipation Hall at the U.S. Capitol in On July 3, the National Archives hosted a reading of Douglass' essay about the Fourth of July.